Setup and Calibration

EtherDrop is designed to be simple to use, and at its basic level anybody can access the drop-net with nothing more than the EtherDrop headset. Fully utilizing the capabilities of the EtherDrop platform, however, can take a bit more complicated system, and it is not necessarily for the faint of heart. While the GPU of the EtherDrop is advanced, it still pales in comparison to what is available on the market. Anybody who plans to use their EtherDrop for gaming, or for technical work such as architecture or engineering, will want to link their headset to their computer and rely on the processing power of that machine. Long sessions online may also require the proper physical support, and recumbent gaming chairs are popular—especially in offices, though most people will simply lie on their bed while they play.

Before accessing the drop-net, the EtherDrop unit must be calibrated to the user’s body. This calibration will ensure proper motor response in the drop-net. Individual programs may also require their own, more precise, calibration. The process consists of performing a series of gestures and touching one’s own body in specific places so the system can get a sense of where you are and what you look like. For most people this will be done standing up. However, amputees and people with physical disabilities that prevent them from standing can follow a different calibration routine while lying down. For people who are quadriplegic or who don’t have arms, the system has a default motor setting that allows control of a randomly generated “generic” avatar. The user may specify the appearance of this avatar.

Setup and Calibration

EtherDrop cosmonette